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Beijing decides to slash the number of vehicles on heavy pollution days Some 80 percent of public vehicles and half of private cars will be banned from Beijing's roads on days of continuous and serious air pollution, the city government said on Thursday. Cars and vans will be limited according to odd and even license numbers during periods of serious air pollution expected to linger for three or more days, according to the city's information office. The authority said cars and vans are largely responsible for the large amounts of fine particulate matter polluting the air in central Beijing. During a news conference on Thursday, Fang Li, spokesman of the Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau, said: "The bureau will inform the public of the traffic control measures more than 12 hours in advance. "However, as forecasting environmental and air quality is more complex than meteorological predictions, the bureau should be more cautious when it comes to the information release," he said. He said that the air quality forecast, once released, will have an big impact on the public. Yu Jianhua, director of the air quality department at the bureau, said the bureau will further refine and improve the mechanism for forecasts and warnings. Ongoing efforts to improve the capital's air quality include reducing coal consumption, improving the quality of fuels and emissions, suspending industrial enterprises that pollute heavily and cracking down on illegal outdoor barbecues. However, despite these measures, Beijing is still the victim of high levels of airborne pollution, with occasional periods of heavy smog. The new plan to limit vehicle numbers, which was approved by the standing committee of the Beijing Municipal People's Congress on Wednesday, will come into force whenever the air quality index is predicted to be above 300 for the three following days. In addition to limits based on license numbers, vehicles transporting construction materials will be banned from the roads during times of heavy pollution, and public transportation, including subway trains and buses, will extend their service hours by 30 minutes to cater to additional commuter needs. The government also aims to cut the number of official vehicles in use at such times by another 30 percent. The government has also announced plans to use more clean-energy vehicles for passenger transportation in downtown areas and the suburbs. Many city residents have welcomed the new moves. "It's worthwhile using publ,Jordan 3 Girls,ic transportation for one day for some fresh air," said Zhang Dong, a 49-year-old resident of the city's Dongcheng district. According to the city's environment bureau, construction sites and some industrial plants that cause pollution will also be required to halt operation on days of heavy pollution. Fireworks and outdoor barbecues will be suspended. Industry is responsible for about 15 percent of the city's air pollution, said Wang Chunlin, director of the bureau's pollution prevention department. The government is cracking down on existing industrial polluters, with more than 1,200 companies due to be removed from the capital by 2016, bringing an expected overall reduction in coal consumption of 2 million tons. The capital is also tightening up on operating licenses for projects that fail energy conservation standards and environmental assessments. As of the end of September,Jordan 11 Kids,, the capital had weeded out 184 polluting enterprises as part of its clean-air action plan. By the end of 2017, authorities aim to have reduced cement production to 4 million tons per year, while the oil refining industry is to be cut to below 10 million tons, the bureau said. Meanwhile, classes in middle schools and kindergartens will be suspended at times of heavy and prolonged pollution to protect students from damage to their respiratory systems. The government is also warning elderly residents, especially those with breathing and heart conditions, to avoid outdoor activities when pollution is high and to wear face masks if they go outside. Beijing's announcement on traffic controls on Thursday came on the same day that the World Health Organization released data on the health risks associated with air pollution. The International Agency for Research on Cancer cited data indicating that in 2010, 223,000 deaths from lung cancer worldwide resulted from air pollution, and said there was also convincing evidence it increases the risk of bladder cancer. Air pollution, mostly caused by transportation, power generation, industrial or agricultural emissions and residential heating and cooking, is already known to raise risks for a wide range of illnesses. Research suggests that in recent years, exposure levels have risen significantly in some parts of the world, particularly countries with large populations going through rapid industrialization such as China.

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BEIJING - Already topping US box office charts, action sequel "Fast & Furious 6" and sci-fi flick "Pacific Rim" are also poised to cash in on the flourishing Chinese film market. However, these Hollywood blockbusters, which are scheduled to debut in Chinese theaters on July 26 and July 31, respectively, will face fierce competition from their Chinese counterparts, including a sequel to a popular coming-of-age drama "Tiny Times" that will hit screens early next month. "Tiny Times," a film inspired by author-turned-director Guo Jingming's novel of the same name, has raked in 475.6 million yuan (about 77.5 million US dollars) in the Chinese mainland since its debut on June 27, according to figures released by China Film News on Tuesday. Zhang Huijun, president of the Beijing Film Academy, said that with the releases of an array of domestic productions, especially ones built around reality-based storylines, it will be a challenge for imported films to take the lion's share of ticket sales in the second half. Among the films to open in the next a few months are urban romance "My Lucky Star," starring Zhang Ziyi, set to debut on September 19, and the action-packed film "Young Detective Dee: Rise of the Sea Dragon," scheduled to open on September 28, according to information released on mtime.com, a major entertainment website, on Saturday. "Personal Tailor," the latest comedy from popular director Feng Xiaogang, will hit screens on December 19, bringing audiences the story of a nouveau riche character's efforts to ascend to the life of an aristocrat. These domestic films are expected to turn up the heat on screens and potentially track the success enjoyed by domestic films in the first half. Official statistics show that China's box office sales totaled 10.99 billion yuan in the first half of 2013, up 36.2 percent year on year, with domestic films surging 144 percent to account for more than 60 percent of the total ticket sales. Of the top ten highest-grossing films, four were domestic, led by adventure-comedy "Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons," which topped China's box office in the first half, outperforming "Iron Man 3." "So Young," "American Dreams in China" and "Finding Mr. Right" rounded out the top five with contemporary stories set in reality. Zhang Yiwu, a profe,Retro Jordan 14,ssor at Beijing University and an active culture critic, said domestic film producers have managed to attract wider audiences, especially people in their 20s and 30s, by relaying stories that resonate with the daily lives of ordinary people. Real-life stories have worked magic for the domestic film industry, which has struggled to gain an advantage over imported films since 2012, the year that China upped its annual quota for imported films, according to Professor Zhang. Under a new China-US film agreement signed in 2012, China increased its annual import quota of Hollywood blockbusters from 20 to 34 and lifted their share of revenue from 17.5 percent to 25 percent. As a result, ticket sales for imported movies contributed 51.54 percent of gross ticket revenue that year, ending domestic films' nine-year dominance at the box office. Encouraged by low-budget comedy "Lost in Thailand," which took in an unprecedented 1.2 billion yuan in less than a month after it debuted on December 12 last year, domestic producers have shifted their focus from blockbuster epics to real-life dramas and comedies. "Audiences, especially young people, are more attached to movies that depict nostalgia and anxiety in life, which provides an outlet for them," said Zhang Yiwu. In recent years, pressure has mounted for Chinese people in their 20s and 30s, a group that is facing ever stiffening competition on the job front and soaring living and housing costs in major cities like Beijing and Shanghai. Domestic movies have opted to communicate with audiences, especially young people, by mirroring the pressures audiences face in real life, while most Hollywood blockbusters are still focused on surreal experiences, said Rao Shuguang, deputy director of the China Film Art Research Center. Hollywood blockbusters screened in the first half included sci-fi blockbusters "Iron Man 3," "Star Trek Into Darkness" and "Man of Steel." Professor Zhang said he believes that domestic films, led by those featuring contemporary storylines, have entered the best phase of development amid a burgeoning domestic market that is already the world,Jordan Xi Gs,'s second-largest. His view was echoed by Zhang Huijun, who forecast that the market share of domestic films could expand further in the second half. However, Rao expressed less optimism about the outlook for the performance of domestic films, citing concerns about the variety and artistic quality of most domestic films. Last year, 893 Chinese domestic films were shown in theaters, compared to only about 50 imported movies, including 34 Hollywood blockbusters.

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A few spectators were involved in an altercation over a seat, with the argument ending in a fight at a Miao ethnic group event in Leishan county, Qiandongnan Miao and Dong autonomous prefecture, Southwest China's Guizhou province. The Miao performance event attracted thousands of people on Wednesday, and luckily police and security were able to stop the fight, news.ifeng.com reported. Traffic police in Shanghai developed a type of human "on/off" switch to help pedestrians safely cross the streets during Golden Week. At one intersection 10 policemen separately stood along the sidewalk, on both sides of the road when the red light was on, so pedestrians would remain ,Iv Jordan,separated from the passing motor vehicles. Once the light turned green, two teams of police moved to the middle of the street forming human "walls" on either side of the zebra crossings, so pedestrians could cross the street safely. Shanghai received about 3.8 million visitors on the third day of the National Day holiday, Shanghai Morining Post reported. Some newspaper also questioned the ne,12 Jordan,cessity. Mortgage business slows Banks in Beijing, Guangzhou, Tianjin and Wuhan suspended their mortgage business as they were running out of bank credit lines. Some banks, even though they did not discontinue their loan services, did however cancel interest rate concessions along with rising interest rates. However, there has been various degrees of extensions allowed on the mortgage approval process. Due to the tight lines on credit loan amounts, housing loan rates for first and second homes,have gone up 10 to 15 percent, said an employee from a China Citic Bank branch in Guangzhou. Heavy real estate loans have experienced an increase this year, which in turn has exacerbated tension on bank credit lines, szsb.sznews.com reported. Mo effects Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo Yan's home became a tourist attraction, as cars stretched over 2 km just to drive by it during the National Day holiday in Pinganzhuang, Gaomi county, East China's Shandong province. The "Mo Yan effect" actually has benefited the local farmers, and his hometown has since become a cultural hotspot. Mo's famous debut novel, Red Sorghum, is currently in production for a new televsion series, epaper.xkb.com.cn reported. Nadal experiences Golden Week Top-ranked Spanish tennis player Rafael Nadal experienced the thrills and frustrations that come with the National Day holiday while visiting the Summer Palace on Thursday in Beijing. Nadal told reporters, "The Summer Palace is very beautiful, but I wasn't expecting such a crowd," sports.qq.com reported. Uni president's response to bank recruitment A micro blog post claiming "do not discriminate against my students" went viral online and was forwarded over 38,000 times. A recruitment provision form Shenzhen's bank said all applicants must be from Project 211 (National Key Universities and colleges with the intent of raising the research standards). A reply from Zhang Bigong, the president of Shenzhen University in Shenzhen, South China's Guangdong province to the students said, "Do not care about the bank recruiter's low quality." Zhang ordered the finance office to close the university's bank account, "If the bank does not change, I will call more than 20,000 parents of the students to remove their money from the bank." The bank immediately changed its recruitment policies, hot.weibo.com reported. Defining patriotic behavior China Central Television (CCTV) conducted random interviews on the streets asking people what patriotic behavior means to them. It's not a question that has a precise answer, as it's up to the individual to express their love for the motherland however they see fit. "To be patriotic means to help an old lady cross the street," said one person from Nanjing. Beijing residents believe it is unpatriotic and irrational to spread rumors on the Internet, especially if the rumors are against the government and can hurt the country. One vegetable farmer from Beijing felt that providing people with safe food to eat is patriotic. And a tourist from Chengdu said that people shouldn't embarrass the Chinese when they are in public or traveling outside the country. Son's perm creates trouble for mother A hip young mother, surnamed Luo, let a barber perm her son's hair, which cost her 800 yuan ($130), in Wuhan, Central China's Hubei province. As a result of the perm, the mother's son, Xiaotian, was often late for school when the new semester first started because his mother spent too much time conditioning his hair in the morning. Xiaotian's mother eventually made her son's hair straight again upon the suggestion of her son's kindergarten teacher. "A perm is not very good for a child's growth, because they may get in the habit of paying too much attention to their appearance," the teacher explained to Luo, whcb.cjn.cn reported.